ATTORNEY ADVERTISING

Articles Tagged with “Residential Lease”

Published on:

A residential landlord client received financing for his building from the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency. In exchange for this financing, Landlord had to maintain a certain amount of low-income units in the building. This financing agreement serves the noble purpose of diversifying buildings, neighborhoods and cities. It has the added virtue of being successful. Unfortunately, it is subject to abuse. In this case, the tenant on the lease did not live in her low income unit. Instead, she lived far out of state and sublet her unit to the highest bidder. This conduct violated her lease, the landlord’s rules and terms of the financing agreement. The Firm represented the Landlord in a case to evict the subletter.
Continue reading →

Published on:

2014 was a busy year for the Firm on the landlord side of the ledger. Some particularly notable NJ landlord-tenant cases include (1) a successful eviction in connection with a tenant’s refusal to cooperate with the Landlord’s lease (required by the NJ Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency); (2) A chronically difficult commercial tenant’s total acquiescence to the Landlord’s demands minutes before trial; (3) A successful defense of a tenant’s illegal apartment claim against a landlord; (4) An eviction of a horrid with horrific behavior for damage to the apartment and (5) a trial judgment in favor of the landlord increasing a tenant’s rent (the tenant refused to pay rent increases for years). Each case, discussed in a separate post, is an example of the Firm’s commitment to delivering cost-effective results to Landlord’s trying to get the most out of their investment.

Published on:

Landlords Beware: Residential Form Leases Do Not Cure All Ills

The word “lease” is a fancy term for a simple agreement: The tenant agrees to pay rent and the landlord agrees to provide a habitable living space. Some leases are lengthy and contain conflicting terms which affect both the landlord’s and the tenant’s rights. In a landlord-tenant case, the court will look at the content of a lease very closely. This is where Google causes more problems than it solves. Free form leases from the internet can be dangerous.

Form residential leases are all over the internet for free. Like most things, if it’s free its too good to be true. For landlords, a free form lease can cost money further down the line. This is especially true if the case goes to landlord-tenant court.

Form leases, by nature, are generic; generic leases can work in as many states as possible. Form leases do not apply relevant New Jersey law and some provisions that protect landlord may be void and inapplicable. Even form leases claiming to be customized for New Jersey may not meet for formal requirements set forth in the law.
The common problems with form leases often relate to two issues: 1) attorney’s fees in connection to litigation and 2) late fees. For example, most form leases have the following attorney’s fee clause:
ATTORNEY’S FEES: In the event that any action is filed in relation to this Lease, the unsuccessful party in the action will pay to the successful party, in addition to all the sums that either party may be called on the pay a reasonable sum for the successful party’s attorney’s fees.
The paragraph seems to say that if landlord sues a tenant, or vice versa, the losing party would pay the attorney’s fees of the winning party. Remember, court hearings for evictions, are considered “legal actions.” Contrary to the plain meaning of the attorney’s fee clause, absent very specific language, attorney’s fee clauses are unenforceable.
Many form leases have following late fee clause:
LATE CHARGE: A late fee of $________ shall be added and due for any payment of rent made after the _______ day of the month.
Even if the clause meets the formal requirements of New Jersey law, a late fee clause may be deemed unenforceable by a court if the late fee is found to be “unreasonable.” Be sure to take care when filling the blanks of the late charge clause on a form lease.
Landlords should take care by having their leases reviewed by an attorney. The Major Law Firm practices landlord tenant law throughout New York and New Jersey assisting landlords and tenants in avoiding unnecessary and costly delays. The firm’s geographic practice area includes: New Jersey (Jersey City, Hoboken, Bayonne, Hudson County, Newark, Essex County, Woodbridge, Middlesex County, Paterson, Passaic County). The Firm invites you to visit the “Promises” page for our new way of doing business Continue reading →

Published on:

New Jersey landlord-tenant actions (a/k/a “summary dispossession actions”) are designed to be quick, efficient methods of disposing of landlord-tenant disputes. The efficiency of a landlord-tenant case lies in the prohibition of responsive pleadings and the “No Discovery” rule. NJ Court Rule 6:4-3 provides that interrogatories and other discovery methods are applicable in all actions except “summary landlord and tenant actions for recovery of the premises.” The “No Discovery” rule poses a problem for landlords alleging wrongful conduct (for example, damage to the apartment or violation of lease rules) by the tenant. How does a landlord prove wrongful conduct? How does a tenant defend against an allegation of wrongful conduct?
Continue reading →

Published on:

New Jersey’s Security Deposit Law, N.J.S.A. 46:8-21.1, requires strict compliance by Landlords. The law’s most rigid requirement is the timing of the return of the deposit. As soon as a tenancy ends, a landlord should be prepared to follow the precise letter of the law. Even an honest mistake can lead to an award of double the security deposit and attorney’s fee’s against the landlord.
Continue reading →

Published on:

Hurricane Sandy left an unprecedented amount of damage throughout New Jersey. Many apartments were damaged by flood, wind and other storm damage. Unfortunately, some apartments were totally destroyed. Parts 1 and 2 of this series explained tenants’ rights when an apartment is damaged. Tenants’ rights are much different when an apartment is so damaged it is destroyed. In these cases, an old statute can be a useful tool.
Continue reading →

Published on:

Part 1 of this series described the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants under the warranty of habitability. Marini explains that a landlord implicitly promises to provide an apartment free of latent defects and maintained in a livable condition. While tenants have a right to a regularly maintained defect free apartment, they also have an obligation to inform the landlords of any problems and allow sufficient time for those problems to be fixed. In most cases, the repairs are made and both parties are happy. If the problems continue, tenants have a number of options to consider.
Continue reading →

Published on:

Super Storm Sandy left permanent marks on New York and New Jersey. Our thoughts and prayers are with all those who suffered a loss. During difficult times, understanding accomplishes far more than contention. This is especially true when peoples’ property and homes are at stake. Both landlords and tenants have certain rights and responsibilities when a property is damaged by a storm. Many times, understanding each position can resolve storm damage disputes quickly and amicably.
Continue reading →

Published on:

A prior post explained that when a tenant is illegally locked out of her apartment, she may pursue an unlawful detainer action under New Jersey’s Unlawful Detainer statute, N.J.S.A. 2A:39-1 et. seq. An unlawful detainer case proceeds in two stages. At the first stage, the court will determine whether the tenant had a right to possession of an apartment and whether that possession was wrongfully denied. Secondly, the court will determine what damages the tenant suffered. At the damage stage, tenants should know what damages can be recovered under the Unlawful Detainer statute.
Continue reading →

Published on:

At the end of a lease term, New Jersey tenants have rights beyond their right to reasonable changes in a proposed lease. Tenants have a right to two separate notices before a landlord can file an eviction action. A landlord’s failure to strictly observe both the content and timing of the notice requirements will result in the dismissal of the eviction action. Before evicting a tenant for refusing lease changes, the content and timing requirements must be strictly observed.
Continue reading →