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Articles Tagged with “Rent Control”

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The Jersey City Rent Control Ordinance requires landlords to provide new tenants with specific information. At the start of each new tenancy a landlord must provide a tenant with a “rental statement” that informs of the tenant of “rent of the prior tenant and notification of the existence of the rent registration law.” The point is pretty simple: If a new tenant finds out her rent is three times what the old tenant paid, she’s more likely to question the legality of the rent. An interesting question presented itself a few weeks ago: What if the owner was the “prior tenant?” What notice is a tenant occupying an apartment after the owner entitled to?
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Northern New Jersey cities like Hoboken and Jersey City maintain sophisticated rent control ordinances. Rent control ordinances are designed to provide landlord’s a “fair” return on investment while keeping urban housing rents affordable. When a tenant is charged an illegal rent (a rent in excess of what rent control ordinance provides) most ordinances require a landlord to give the tenant a credit towards future rent. The credit is the amount of the overcharge per month for as many months as the tenant was overcharged. But, the time length of the overcharge is not unlimited. Jersey City and Hoboken have two very different approaches to determining the amount of a rent control overcharge. The distinction lies in the difference between a statute of limitation and a statute of repose.
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Local rent control laws are an important part of maintaining an affordable housing supply in densely populated areas. Prior posts explained the basics of rent control and some nuances between cities. Generally, tenants who pay rent in excess of the rent control rent (the “legal rent”) have two remedies. The first is an application to the local rent control board (sometimes called a rent leveling board) for a credit. The credit allows a tenant to pay a reduced rent going forward until the tenant “catches up” with the overcharge. The second remedy is much more powerful. Violations of rent control ordinances are actionable under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act (the “CFA”). Under the CFA, a rent control overcharge may entitle a tenant to triple damages and mandatory attorney’s fees. The principle that a rent control violation is also a consumer fraud violation comes from an Appellate Division decision called Wozniak v. Pennella, 373 N.J. Super. 445 (App. Div. 2004).
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